School Heads’ Commitments in Practicing Six Characteristics of Clinical Supervision in Tanzania: Views of Male and Female Teachers

Volume 6 Issue 1
Linus Chaula
Pages: 1-15 Download Count : 351 View Count: 604 DOI Number 10.55236/tuara.1184224 Facebook Share on Google+ Save to Zotero Save to Mendeley

Abstract:


This study aimed at examining teachers’ perceptions on school heads’ practices of six characteristics of clinical supervision through interviewing 28 and surveying 94 secondary school teachers in public secondary schools in Tanzania. In this mixed concurrent and cross-sectional case study design, school heads respecting teachers as professionals was a first dominant practice in clinical supervision and academic mentorships was a last dominant practice. Despite of dominance, school heads’ commitments in practicing six characteristics of clinical supervision was positively perceived by male and female teachers and no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed among them. Due to school heads’ commitments in undertaking six characteristics of clinical supervision, teachers’ sense of teaching professional competence grew sufficiently. The study found a positive correlation and statistical significance (p<0.01) between school heads’ commitments in practicing six characteristics of clinical supervision and teachers’ sense of teaching professional competence development. The study concludes that through six characteristics of clinical supervisor, male and female teachers were equally supervised by school heads. It also concludes that six characteristics of clinical supervision are positive predictors for developing teachers’ sense of teaching professional competences

Keywords

  • Characteristics of clinical supervision
  • clinical supervision practices
  • female teachers
  • male teachers
  • school heads
Download PDF